Reflections on the Composer Mentorship Program, Part I

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Today’s post is written by Max Carlson, The Schubert Club’s Program and Production Associate who manages our Composer Mentorship Program. 


Did you know that The Schubert Club hosts a unique opportunity for high-school student composers called the Composer Mentorship Program? Each year, students in the greater Twin Cities area can apply to work with The Schubert Club’s composer-in-residence Edie Hill for the coming academic year. The students selected to participate benefit from bi-weekly lessons, roundtable sessions, and concert outings as a group. Specific opportunities include:

  • composition, notation, orchestration and the creative process
  • attendance at local performances, rehearsals, and workshops
  • college preparation and career-building opportunities
  • premiere of their work on The Schubert Club’s Courtroom Concert Series
  • one-year membership to the American Composers Forum

The mentorship program is offered free of charge to each selected composer and is sponsored in part by HRK Foundation.

As we gear up for the 2016-2017 season, we asked our participants from this past season to share a few reflections on their time in the program:

louisabyron_webLouisa Byron
The Schubert Club Composer Mentorship Program has helped me in so many ways in accomplishing my dreams of becoming a composer. At the welcoming reception, I knew right away that this program was going to be an awarding experience. The concerts we attended inspired me so much to try new techniques and expanded the music that I listen to. It was so helpful to have the Copper Street Brass Quintet perform and give us composers advice on how to write for brass. On the Thursday nights, Edie Hill encouraged me to think outside the box of what I was used to writing for. This program helped me realize that composing is what I want to study in college and eventually have as a career. I would like to thank The Schubert Club and the people who made this opportunity possible.

simonpeters_webSimon Peters
The Schubert Club’s Composer Mentorship Program has been greatly enjoyable for me throughout the year. With Edie’s mentorship I have gained a better understanding of my creative process, and more confidence in my work. Also, the interaction with other composers and Copper Street Brass has been lovely and has helped shape my composing process. My entire experience with the program has been absolutely wonderful.

seamusflyn_webSeamus Flynn
The Schubert Club Mentorship Program has been an excellent opportunity to connect with a composer mentor, a professional ensemble, and other high school composers. Since I was in frequent contact with the ensemble-in-residence, I saw it as an opportunity to try new things, and Edie Hill is a very encouraging mentor. I also have fond memories of standing around with other high school composers after concerts of new music, and analyzing what the composers had done well and not well. I highly recommend the Program.

saraahbushara_webSaraah Bushara
I am certainly not alone in saying that my experience with The Schubert Club Composer Mentorship Program has been completely vital and invaluable to my growth as a composer and to my musical education in general. To be able to mold musical ideas into complete, listenable pieces is virtually impossible to achieve alone, as what makes sense musically to us may not make sense to an audience, and a program that combines not only a mentor with world-class breadth of musical experience with extensive interaction a professional ensemble is the most effective way to teach the craft of composition.

Next week some of the mentorship alumni from years past will share their experiences with the program and where they are now.

Learn more about the Composer Mentorship Program and download an application here: http://schubert.org/education/composer-mentorship/

The Deadline to apply for the 2016-2017 season is Monday, June 20, 2016.

 

My Top Three Criteria for Selecting Artists

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One of the many interesting things my job involves is listening to live concerts by solo artists and ensembles whom we might invite to perform on a Schubert Club series.  You can learn a lot from a demo recording of course, but not everything.  In fact, the most important thing you can learn from a demo (or commercial) recording is that a particular musician or ensemble is probably not destined for the priority list.

In recent weeks I’ve found myself with the opportunity to hear quite a few concerts.  It got me thinking about what my criteria are for ranking and prioritizing potential Schubert Club guests.  I’ve narrowed it down to 3 areas: technique, interest (substance) and communication.

Technical ability is probably the least important, simply because there’s such a high level of proficiency among professional soloists and ensembles these days.  Indeed, it’s probably fair to say that if you ever get the impression at a concert that a piece of music is really difficult and pushing the performer(s) to their limit, then it’s probably more a reflection on the limitations of the artist than the technical problems of a piece of music.  Great performances usually transcend technical difficulties.

So, the more important question is whether a performance is interesting, meaning does it capture my attention, unlock the imagination? That comes down to choices a musician makes around musical colors and textures, variation, consistency of approach, creating tension, the overall shape of a piece, tastefulness and context.  Much of this is subjective, which is why it’s okay, indeed healthy, for people to disagree after a concert whether they liked it or not.

Thirdly, there’s the issue of communication. Unlike a recording, an artist or ensemble on stage with a live audience has to acknowledge the audience is there and perform for them. Singers maybe have the advantage of words to articulate, but instrumental music is a language too, and the live concert experience is about communicating. I’ve written before about the importance of communication among musicians in an ensemble, but just as important is that those making the music are expressing something they believe in to those who are listening.  That sounds a little “obvious” when written down, but think of recent concerts you have attended and ask yourself whether this has always been the case.  The most memorable concerts I’ve attended are those at which that communication has been strong and convincing.

Lucky for us, there are many, many musicians and ensembles across the world who deliver at the highest level.  Our lives are more enriched for having the exposure to them.

 

Barry Kempton is Artistic & Executive Director of The Schubert Club. Originally from the UK, his previous management experience spans 25 years at the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and City of London Sinfonia.
More posts by Barry Kempton

 

Theoroi Recap: March & April 2016

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Today’s blog post about Theoroi is written by The Schubert Club’s Marketing Intern, Quinn Shadko.

Theoroi is a Schubert Club program attempting to cultivate the next generation of Twin Cities arts audiences. The 30 members of this group (all in their 20s and 30s) attend a “sampler package” of ten performing arts events across the Twin Cities to get a wide variety of cultural experiences. The group attends one performance per month. The group then uses social media to share their experiences with their own social network.


Spring has been good to the Theoroi Arts Ambassadors! The months of March and April each offered a unique arts event: a mandolin-accordion-percussion trio from Israel, and a new musical inspired by a well-known historical figure, respectively.

 

Theoroi member Katie Heilman writes about her experience at the Schubert Club Mix concert featuring Avi Avital:
 
A concert featuring both Bulgarian folk music and Bach on the same program? That’s exactly what we heard when Avi Avital came to town in early March. On Tuesday, March 8, The Schubert Club presented mandolinist Avi Avital with Ksenija Sidorova on accordion and Itamar Doari on percussion at Aria as part of the Schubert Club Mix series. This captivating concert featured a blend of classical and folk music from around the world. Titled Between Worlds, Avital was inspired by composers like Bela Bartok and Astor Piazzolla, who took folk music from their own cultures and incorporated them into new compositions. Avital chose works by classical composers who were influenced by folk music and arranged them for mandolin, accordion, and a large variety of percussion instruments. The concert included works by several composers, such as Bartok, Bach, Bloch, and Villa-Lobos, as well as traditional folk tunes from Turkey, Bulgaria, and Israel. 
 
Each of the musicians were energetic, passionate performers. There’s a reason Avital was nominated for a Grammy. At one point, one of my fellow Theoroi members leaned over and whispered, “His right hand is just a blur!” After the concert, the musicians stayed around for a little meet-and-greet, where they autographed CDs and chatted with audience members. It was a delightful treat and an exciting way to spend a Tuesday
 
The next month, Theoroi ventured away from classical and folk music to the world of contemporary, and local, musical theatre.
 
theaterlatteda_blog
Theoroi member Elsa Cook describes Theater Latte Da’s World Premiere of “C.” (This show still has a few performances left, but tickets are selling fast.)
 
On a beautiful Sunday in April, Theoroi ascended upon The Ritz Theater in Northeast Minneapolis. Long a venue I’d been daydreaming of checking out, I was excited for this opportunity to get inside. The performance of the month was “C.”, presented by Theater Latte Da (a very cool non-profit musical theater production company that stages shows at a variety of theaters throughout the Twin Cities, and would be worth another blog post all their own at some point, but that’s another story). 
 
“C.” is set in mid-1600s France, with the characters separated by war for much of the time. It’s a love triangle with an element of Shakespearean mistaken-identity. I suppose a modern interpretation would be something along the lines of Boy loves Girl, who wants to date Boy’s Dumb Friend, so Girl asks Boy to tell his Dumb Friend to find her on Facebook. From there “Dumb Friend” seduces her through Facebook Messenger, but actually it is Boy writing those messages all along. Something like that.
 
The set was gorgeous, featuring soft white lighting and a huge, majestic tree. The coolest part of the experience, though, was probably the script. I realized that although this story was first written in French prose in 1897, the script I saw come to life was a whole new creation (since poetry can’t be translated line for line, because it won’t rhyme). Local actor Bradley Greenwald was the writer of “C.” as well as the lead character, and he spoke to the audience after the show about the process of translating every word, and how he was struck by the power of the raw emotion that remained, even when that translated version was no longer melodic. He aimed for a final product that was musical but not glittery to the point of distracting an audience from the humanness. Mission accomplished, Greenwald. 
 
The Theoroi Arts Ambassadors are looking forward to the final two events of the season, Minnesota Opera’s The Shining in May and Liquid Music’s Orpheus Unsung in June. 
The 2015-2016 season started in September 2015 and will conclude in June 2016. Recruitment for new members will begin soon. If you are interested, or know someone who is, put be touch with theoroi@schubert.org for more info on joining. 

April – Not Your Average Month at The Schubert Club

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April is always a busy month for The Schubert Club.  I’ve noted this in prior years but in spite of that awareness, this year is no different. During this middle period of April, we have a concert or event practically every day.  For anyone who might wonder all that The Schubert Club does exactly, here’s what has been going on.  It’s a good cross-section of the breadth of our activities.

  • Schubert Club Mix at Bedlam Lowertown – the season finale of this series of next generation concerts in less formal venues featured singer-songwriter Gabriel Kahane and pianist/composer Timo Andres.
  • Live at the Museum – a fascinating exploration of the life and works of Celius Dougherty put together by Mark Bilyeu and friends which included some of the archives of our Museum collection.
  • Music in the Park Series – yesterday’s final chamber music concert of the series in St Anthony Park featured the excellent Chiara String Quartet. While in the Twin Cities, we also presented the quartet in two family concerts on Friday evening, and they make visits to a school and the St Anthony Park Home today.
  • Last week, we had our Advisory Circle spring meeting and were delighted to have one of the Student Scholarship competition winners perform some Schubert songs.

Recitals, chamber music, music education and financial support for young musicians, museum programs and music appreciation: this is what The Schubert Club is all about.  And though programs and focuses have changed with the times, I believe that the founders of The Schubert Club back in 1882 would approve and delight in the fact that their club still thrives and is, I believe, making a difference in this community.  Thank you for your support.

Friends Making Music

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Some people reading this blog entry may recognize the above title as the one chosen by Gabriel Kahane and Timo Andres for their fascinating program on our Schubert Club Mix series tomorrow evening.  It will be an eclectic mix of older, traditional songs (Schubert, Schumann) newer old songs (Britten, Ives) and brand new music written by the artists themselves – both highly regarded composers.  I am really looking forward to the music and the musicians – both really intrigue me.

There’s also something about their program title itself “Friends Making Music” that makes the performance very appealing.  I’ve written in the past about some of my most memorable concert experiences, when the spirit and enjoyment of the musicians on stage is so clear that these affect – or indeed infect – the audience.  There’s a palpable intimacy shared between performers on stage which spreads to the audience and makes the audience’s experience feel more special.

Friends making music is really at the heart of small ensemble music-making, be it classical chamber music or jazz or rock and pop.  Groups and ensembles who aren’t engaged in their music-making, enjoying and responding to the playing of the musicians around them, these groups usually fail in public performances to make much of an impression.

Friends making music also speaks directly to the way The Schubert Club got started back in 1882 when the State of Minnesota was just a few decades old.  Women with musical abilities of various levels found themselves in new homes, in a new city and presumably with plenty of time on their hands.  They formed a music club and got together to play with one another.  Though 130+ years later, being part of The Schubert Club no longer requires membership nor an audition, the spirit of The Schubert Club remains tied to that original essence of 1882.  We are united by our enthusiasm and passion for music – listening, playing, learning and admiring.

Tell Us Your Ideas for Developing a 21st Century Schubert Club

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Did you know The Schubert Club has a Digital Technology Committee?

Yes, though our name harkens back to the 19th century and though we will always be a musical organization steeped in history, we formed this committee last year to develop some clarity around how we utilize technology now, where we’re currently missing out and, perhaps most importantly, where we should be focusing our resources (limited of course) as we plan for the future. 

In the past six months, we have received an excellent digital technology audit of current practice (thanks to excellent work by Aaron Wulff) and brainstormed a variety of directions in which technology could take us.  Imagine for instance a Google street view tour of our Museum. 

After several broad discussions, we have narrowed our attention to exploring how technology can enhance music events.  Our main “laboratory” will be Schubert Club Mix (since this is intentionally a concert series with less formality).  We will be developing ideas for at least one of the four programs next season.  I can’t reveal how the experience will be different, as the plan is not complete yet.  I do know however, that we intend to interact with our audience in the days preceding the concert and that the first part of the concert experience in the venue is likely to engage the audience in “doing stuff” upon arrival – before even the musical performance begins.   Our intent is for it to be fun and informative.

Whatever we do, it will not detract from the performance itself and will be respectful to the performers.

We are interested to know about experiences you have had which have enhanced a concert you’ve attended – especially those using technology.  Please do let us know in the comments below. The development of this program will be happening over the coming 2-3 months.

On a separate note, I was saddened today to learn of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies’ death.  I had the privilege of working with Max early in my career at the Scottish Chamber Orchestra – both in programming and for several years coordinating the composer institute he led on the Island of Hoy.   He was a great man, a very special musician and someone who commanded total respect without ever demanding it.  But most of all, I will remember him as a passionate advocate for music education, able to speak more articulately than anyone I know (always without notes) on the importance of music in the lives of young people.  Thank you Max for the difference you made in so many lives.

Theoroi Recap: January and February 2016

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Today’s blog post about Theoroi is written by The Schubert Club’s Marketing Intern, Quinn Shadko.

Theoroi is a Schubert Club program attempting to cultivate the next generation of Twin Cities arts audiences. The 30 members of this group (all in their 20s and 30s) attend a “sampler package” of ten performing arts events across the Twin Cities to get a wide variety of cultural experiences. The group then uses social media to share their experiences with their own social network.

The 2015-2016 season started in September 2015 and will conclude in June 2016. The group attends one performance per month.


 

The Theoroi Arts Ambassadors have now entered into the second half of their 2015-16 season of programming! January and February brought two distinct cultural experiences for the group: chamber music accompanying silent film and a performance of Indian song and dance.

CZHFBzRU8AAQNp7On January 9, Theoroi attended The Schubert Club’s performance of Accordo with Silent Film at the beautiful new Ordway Concert Hall. In the first half of the program, a string quartet performed music to accompany the 1920 silent picture “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”. This German horror film featured a crazed doctor who hypnotized a sleepwalker into committing murders, and the music was appropriately dark, distressing, and dissonant. During intermission, the group gathered for a quick private reception. The second half of the program was completely different, as the 1924 silent film “Sherlock, Jr.” was an absurd comedy about the perils of solving crime and young love.  We audience members were encouraged to cheer and jeer along with the story, and the energy of the piece was infectious. My favorite part had to be when the members of Accordo pulled out kazoos to accompany a particularly funny scene. The original music for both silent films was composed by the engaging Stephen Prutsman, who also played piano alongside Accordo in the second piece. I had never attended a concert like this one before, and it made for an incredibly effective and singular experience. 

 

2016-02-19 19.53.08On February 19, Theoroi attended Ragamala Dance Company’s They Rose at Dawn at The Cowles Center. This performance focused on the power of women – their different roles, their strengths, and their symbolism. Before the show, the group met with mother and daughter Ranee Ramaswamy and Aparna Ramaswamy, the co-artistic directors of Ragamala Dance. We learned about the origins of the company, its touring history, and the traditions of the music and choreography. We then took part in a series of interactive pre-show board games based on the Indian classic “Snakes and Ladders”. Playing the game was a fun way to connect with and learn about the culture, and it emphasized the role of fate in the unfolding of human lives. The performance itself consisted of three short dance pieces performed solo by Aparna and accompanied by Carnatic instruments and singing. Each choreographed vignette depicted a woman at different points in her life, and although I couldn’t understand the foreign words, Aparna’s spirited and connected dancing communicated everything. With just four musicians, one dancer, and one ornate costume, Ragamala Dance presented an incredibly beautiful evening of storytelling that was both novel and nuanced.

 

It has been wonderful sharing new experiences and making new friends with the members of Theoroi, and I’m looking forward to attending the remaining four events of the season!

 

Learn more about Theoroi and check out our calendar of events here. 

Announcing the 2016 Schubert Club Competition Finalists!

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We are thrilled to share the results of the 2016 Schubert Club Bruce P. Carlson Student Scholarship Competition. The students listed below will go on to compete in the Final Round on March 19 where two winners from each category will be chosen for cash prizes and the opportunity to perform in the annual Winners’ Recital at the Ordway Concert Hall. We had over 175 students participate in this year’s competition. Congratulations to all our finalists, and thank you to all our wonderful volunteers!

To see photos from the event, check out our Instagram feed at instagram.com/schubertclub.

Learn more about the competition here.

FINALISTS, 2016

Voice Level I (Age 18 – 21)

Francesca Dawis, V115
Soprano
Stanford University
Wendy Hillhouse

Erica Hoops, V114
Soprano
St. Olaf College
Tracey Engleman

Alma Neuhaus, V117
Mezzo
St. Olaf College
Anna Mooy

Claire Powling, V106
Soprano
University of Wisconsin – Madison
Mimmi Fulmer

Olivia Schurke, V109
Soprano
St. Olaf College
Tracey Engleman

Jacob Sorrells, V112
Tenor
St. Olaf College
Tracey Engelman

Nicholas Swanson, V113
Tenor
St. Olaf College
Dale Kruse

Voice Level II (ages 22-25)

Eric John Broker, V204
Baritone
St. Olaf College
George Smith

Audra Fuchsel, V206
Mezzo
Viterbo University
Daniel Johnson-Wilmot

Emily Johnson, V202
Soprano
University of Minnesota – Morris
Emma Small

Meghan Lowe
Soprano
Normandale Community College
Debra Capener

Austin Sanders, V208
Baritone
Viterbo University
Daniel Johnson-Wilmot

Voice Level III (ages 26-30)

Elena Bird, V313
Soprano
Trish McCaffrey

Andrew Lovato, V309
Baritone
Ken Shaw

Eric G. Meyer, V303
Bass
University of Minnesota – Duluth
John Charles Pierce

Clara Osowski, V301
Mezzo
University of Iowa
Emma Small

Sarah Richardson, V310
Soprano
University of Wisconsin – Madison
Paul Rowe

Katherine Weber, V302
Soprano
Indiana University
Costanza Cuccaro

Piano Level I (grades 7-9)

Amanda Chan, P105
Wayzata Central Middle School
Alexander Braginsky

Austin Cheng, P106
Wayzata Central Middle School
Alexander Braginsky

Margaret Wang, JP03
Falcon Ridge Middle School
Alexander Braginsky

Emma Taggart, P110
Saint Agnes
Reid Smith

Anson Tiong, P111
McGuire Middle School
Tania Spector

Kimberly Shen, P101

Chippewa Middle School

Alexander Braginsky

Piano Level II (Grades 10-12)

Abigail Arkley, P211
Home School
Kevin Hobbs

Chen Chen, P204
Edina High School
Denis Evstuhin

Crystal Cheng, P206
Wayzata High School
Alexander Braginsky

Collin Jinks, P205
Stillwater Area High School
Jo Ann Link

Madeline Pape, P220
Moundsview High School
Philip Low

Noah Qiu, P215
Woodbury High School
Jo Ann Link

Zhen Tu, P212
Eagan High School
Lydia Artymiw

Piano Level III (college freshman – age 23)

Anthony Capparelli, P301
Lawrence University
Catherine Kautsky

Josue Gonzalez, P309
University of Minnesota
Alexander Braginsky

Xuan He, P312
St. Olaf College
Kent McWilliams

Ming Hu, P318
Lawrence Universtiy
Catherine Kautsky

Neil Krzeski, P324
Lawrence University
Michael Mizrahi

Evan Newman, P321
Lawrence University
Anthony Padilla

Thomas Pearson, P313
St. Olaf College
Nancy Paddleford

Strings Level I (Grades 7-9)

Maximus Gurath, S108
Cello
Edison Middle School
Jia Ciao

Derek Hwang, S106
Cello
North Middle School
Peter Howard

Matthew Pakola, S103
Violin
South View Middle School
Sally O’Reilly

Katia Tesarczyk, S107
Violin
Central High School
Sally O’Reilly

Joyce Zhao, S104
Violin
Valley View Middle School
Sally O’Reilly

Strings Level II (Grades 10-12)

Sara Aldana, S208
Violin
Shattuck St. Mary’s
Sally O’Reilly

Eliot Johnson, S201
Cello
Edina High School
Tanya Remenikova

Naomi Powers, S204
Violin
Mitchell High School
Doosook Kim

Emma Richman, S210
Violin
Southwest High School
Susan Crawford

Clara Schubilske, S213
Violin
Moundsview High School
Sally O’Reilly


Strings Level III (College Freshman – Age 23)

Andrew Altmaier, S313
Cello
St. Olaf College
David Carter

Michael Chu, S307
Violin
University of Minnesota
Sally O’Reilly

Clair Elrod, S316
Violin
St. Catherine University
James Garlick

Arjun Ganguly, #303
Viola
University of Minnesota
Sabina Thatcher

Sophia Spiegel, S312
Cello
St. Olaf College
David Carter

Alastair Witherspoon, S310
Violin
University of Minnesota
Sally O’Reilly

Brass & Woodwind Level I (Grades 9-12)

Lauren Flaten, BW114
Flute
Roseville Area High School
Judy Ranheim

Claire Gunsbury, BW101
Flute
Brainerd High School
Immanuel Davis

Shruti Gupta, BW113
Flute
Blake School
Michele Frisch

Faith April Helgeson, BW111
Flute
Brightmount Academy
Julia Bogorad-Kogan

Annika Johnson, BW104
French Horn
Home School
Caroline Leman

Shreya Narayan, BW112
Flute
East Ridge High School
Nancy Maloney

Russel Sweet, BW105
Saxophone
Roseville Area High School
Preston Duncan

Brass & Woodwind Level II (College Freshman – Age 28)

Jeiran Hasan, BW207
Flute
Universtiy of Iowa
Nicole Esposito

Kurt Hattenberger, BW218
Saxophone
University of Minnesota
Preston Duncan

Hannah Hickman, BW209
Saxophone
University of Minnesota
Preston Duncan

Katie Ann Kohler, BW212
Flute
University of Minnesota
Julia Bogorad-Kogan

Antonio Patrick, BW203
Trombone
St. Olaf College
Larry Zimmerman

Matthew Pilmer, BW217
Saxophone
University of Minnesota
Preston Duncan

Justin Sales, BW214
Saxophone
University of Minnesota
Preston Duncan

Tim Shows, BW215
Oboe
University of Minnesota
Basil Reeve

Elizabeth Sperry, BW210
Flute
St. Catherine University
Julia Bogorad-Kogan

On Sale Now: Accordo at Icehouse, Tuesday, May 10, 2016

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Update: This event is now sold out. 

 

Just Announced: Accordo at Icehouse

Tuesday, May 10, 2016, 7:30pm
Icehouse, 2528 Nicollet Avenue South, Minneapolis

Join us for this one-night-only performance at Icehouse and get to know the music and the musicians in a casual, Q&A style format.

We know you just can’t get enough of Accordo, so we’ve added a special performance the evening following the final concert of the season. Join Accordo on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 in a special concert at the Minneapolis music venue and restaurant, Icehouse. The group will be performing excerpts from the previous night’s performance featuring Dvorak’s String Sextet in A major, Opus 48 and Brahms’s String Sextet No. 2 in G major, Opus 36 while discussing the repertoire and taking questions from the audience. If you joined us for one of our Accordo at Amsterdam performances in the past, you can expect a similar experience for this event. 

Tickets are general admission and can be purchased at schubert.org/accordo or 651.292.3268
$12 if purchased in advance or $15 at the door. Act soon! This event may sell out quickly. 
 

About Accordo:
Accordo, established in 2009, is a Minnesota-based chamber group composed of Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and Minnesota Orchestra current and former principal players Rebecca Albers, Ruggero Allifranchini, Steven Copes, Erin Keefe, Kyu-Young Kim, Maiya Papach, Anthony Ross, and Ronald Thomas.

About Icehouse:
Icehouse is located in what was originally the loading docks to the old Cedar Fuel and Ice where over 75,000 tons of Ice was harvested each year and later a part of Icehouse studios where many audio and video recordings took place. The original brick and wood ceiling still remains and was incorporated into the design of Icehouse the restaurant, bar and music venue. While we are not harvesting 75,000 tons, shooting videos nor recording albums, The space still remains true to the original industrial aesthetic and we honor our predecessors of the space by employing our take on classical food and drink recipes and by keeping the music going.
 
 
Thank you to our Season Sponsor:

AccreditedInvestorsLogo_vert_715-650px-100qlty-615hor-nobg (1)
 

Thank you to our Media Sponsor:
99.3 Classical MPR

Announcing the 2016-2017 Season

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We are very pleased to share with you our 134th season, featuring the International Artist Series at Ordway Center for the Performing Arts and the Music in the Park Series at Saint Anthony Park United Church of Christ. 

Subscriptions will be on sale Monday, February 15 at 8:30am. Single tickets will be on sale Monday, August 1, at 11am. The best way to guarantee tickets to these very popular series is to purchase a subscription. Read more about subscriptions at the bottom of this email.

 

Artistic and Executive Director, Barry Kempton, introduces the 2016-2017 International Artist Series

 

2016-2017 International Artist Series

The Schubert Club’s International Artist Series engages the world’s great artists in recitals for audiences at the Ordway Center for the Performing Arts in Saint Paul. First presented 124 years ago, this highly sought-after recital series offers ticket prices that are among the lowest in America for comparable concerts.

 
 

Renée Fleming, soprano

Wednesday, October 5, 2016, 7:30pm
Ordway Music Theater

In the words of the Star Tribune, “Renée Fleming is a true diva du jour. Her sumptuous soprano, dazzling technique and glamorous persona make her the complete package.” No wonder, then, that this multiple Grammy Award winner has performed in such an extraordinary range of venues, from the balcony of Buckingham Palace to the Super Bowl, President Obama’s inauguration to the 2008 Olympics in Beijing—as well as the most prestigious concert halls and opera stages in the world. With an extraordinary multimedia presence unique among contemporary opera singers, Fleming has made a unique and indelible mark as one of our generation’s most respected and renowned vocalists and performers, both on the stage and off. In addition to her live performances, Fleming has also hosted and appeared in a wide variety of television and radio broadcasts, including the Metropolitan Opera’s Live in HD series, Live from Lincoln Center and the Twin Cities’ own Prairie Home Companion. Having previously graced The Schubert Club stage in 2001, 2005, and 2010, we are once again delighted to present soprano Renée Fleming—for just a single night —as she opens the 2016-2017 International Artist Series.

 

 

Augustin Hadelich, violin & Joyce Yang, piano

Tuesday, November 29, 2016, 7:30pm
Thursday, December 1, 2016, 10:30am
Ordway Concert Hall

With a remarkable consistency throughout his repertoire—from Paganini to Adès—German violinist Augustin Hadelich continually astonishes audiences with a phenomenal technique and poetic sensitivity seldom see in a single artist. In fact, after his January, 2014 performance of the Beethoven violin concerto at Disney Hall (conducted by Edo de Waart), his uncanny blend of technical mastery and refreshing spontaneity prompted the Los Angeles Times to enthusiastically applaud his “pinpoint intonation and surprising turns of phrase.” Similarly, pianist Joyce Yang—who at just 29 years of age has performed as soloist around the world—repeatedly dazzles audiences and critics alike with sheer technique, while simultaneously creating “moment after moment that surprises the listener with a bit of extra musical insight” (Aspen Times). A native of Seoul, South Korea, Yang took her first piano lesson when she was just four years old and entered the prestigious School of Music at the Korea National University of Arts just six years later at the age of 10. The Schubert Club is thrilled to present these two remarkable artists—gifted with extraordinary technical skills and innate artistry—together on the same stage as part of this year’s International Artist Series.

 

 

Gil Shaham, solo violin

Sunday, January 8, 2017, 3:00pm
Ordway Music Theater

To say that Gil Shaham is one of the foremost violinists of our time may actually be a bit of an understatement. Shaham’s career took off in 1989 when he replaced the legendary Itzhak Perlman (who was unable to perform for health reasons) for a six-concerto, three-night marathon with the London Symphony Orchestra at Royal Festival Hall. Still a high school senior and a student at Juilliard, Shaham stepped off the Concorde at Heathrow to find a throng of reporters, onlookers and curiosity seekers. If the 18-year old seemed unfazed by it all, perhaps it’s because he’d made his debut with the Jerusalem Symphony at age 10 and with the Israel Philharmonic the following year. His flawless technique combined with his inimitable warmth and generosity of spirit has solidified his renown as a true American master. A multiple Grammy Award-winner and Musical America’s “Instrumentalist of the Year,” Shaham has played virtually every major concert hall in the world. The Schubert Club is thrilled to welcome Gil Shaham back to the Ordway Music Theater stage for a single performance this season and his second appearance in the International Artist Series.

 

 
 

Miah Persson, soprano & Florian Boesch, baritone with Malcolm Martineau, piano

Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 10:30am
Thursday, March 30, 2017, 7:30pm
Ordway Concert Hall

Accompanied by Malcolm Martineau—one of the world’s leading collaborative pianists and favorite among Schubert Club audiences—soprano Miah Persson and baritone Florian Boesch each make their debut in the The Schubert Club’s International Artist Series. As a member of the Royal Swedish Opera, soprano Miah Persson has wowed audiences with “spine-tingling moments of vocal splendour” (Edinburgh Spotlight), while the effusive and natural brightness of her voice beguiles listeners with a “sense of gentle repose . . . mixing charm, depth and romantic ardour” (The Sunday Times). Similarly, Austrian baritone Florian Boesch “doesn’t just sing this music, he inhabits it to the hilt” (The Independent), delivering “a lived experience, with flashes of transcendence” (The New York Times). Helping to shape this special performance, pianist Malcolm Martineau, brings extraordinary chemistry and freshness to every piece. Don’t miss this unique, one of a kind performance by three international masters.

 

 
 

Alexandre Tharaud, piano

Thursday, April 27, 2017, 7:30pm
Friday, April 28, 2017, 10:30am
Ordway Concert Hall

Despite a flourishing international career that includes performances at such legendary venues as Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw, London’s Royal Festival Hall and the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in his native Paris, pianist Alexandre Tharaud only played in the U.S. for the first time in January 2015. Clearly, it was well worth the wait. NY Times critic Vivien Schweitzer hailed his debut performance at Carnegie Hall as full of both “articulation and wild exuberance.” As the son of a dance teacher at the Opéra de Paris and the grandson of a violinist, it should come as no surprise that Tharaud’s technical expertise and his “range of touch and colour, and his sheer enthusiasm, shine through every jewel-like piece” (The Guardian.) What is a bit strange, perhaps, is that Tharaud refuses to keep a piano at his own residence for fear that he will come to prefer improvisation and experimentation to rigorous practice. All the better for his audiences who continually delight in his “crisply articulated and vividly etched” (NY Times) renditions of Bach and others. The Schubert is proud to welcome Alexandre Tharaud to the Ordway Concert Hall stage for two dates in April 2017 for his International Artist Series debut.

 


 

2016-2017 Music in the Park Series

A cherished and distinctive audience favorite, the Schubert Club’s Music in the Park Series presents chamber music concerts at the acoustically and architecturally superb Saint Anthony Park United Church of Christ, “home” to the series since 1979. This intimate setting fosters a palpable connection among composers, musicians and audiences that simply cannot be recreated in larger halls. Whether you’ve been attending for years or are brand new to the series, we invite you to experience chamber music and musicians up close, during the pre-concert talks, performances and at our post-concert gatherings.

 

Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Pianist Joseph Kalichstein, violinist Jaime Laredo, and cellist Sharon Robinson have been performing together for 40 years, making the trio one of the longest-lived ensembles with all of its original members. Very early in the group’s existence, they performed at the White House for President Carter’s Inauguration in the late ‘70s. “The KLR players are superstars of the chamber music world” (The Washington Post), artfully balancing the careers of three internationally-acclaimed soloists while making annual appearances at some of the world’s most prestigious concert halls. A favorite ensemble of the Music in the Park Series audience, come hear why the Washington Post has emphatically stated, “Can we just be done with it, and declare the Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio the greatest piano trio on the face of the Earth?”

 

 

Pacifica String Quartet with Johannes Moser, cello

Sunday, November 6, 2016

Known for their virtuosity, exuberance, and often-daring repertory choices, the Pacifica Quartet consistently plays with “clarity, perfect togetherness and the finest of tuning” (The London Times). Their numerous awards include the Avery Fisher Career Grant in 2006, Musical America’s “Ensemble of the Year” in 2009, and a 2009 Grammy Award for Best Chamber Music Performance. Internationally recognized as one of the foremost interpreters of string quartet cycles, the Pacifica performed all of the Beethoven quartets on Music in the Park Series over three seasons, from 2008-2011. The Pacifica String Quartet’s immersive and unforgettable style takes us to a realm “to which only the miracle of music can transport us” (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette). German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser, top prize-winner in the 2002 Tchaikovsky Competition, joins the Pacifica in Schubert’s beloved String Quintet and a new quintet by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Julia Wolfe, a co-commission of the Schubert Club and three partnering presenters.

 
 
 

Danish String Quartet

Sunday, February 12, 2017

The Danish String Quartet’s joy for making music and “rampaging energy” (The New Yorker) is utterly infectious. Embodying the quintessential elements of chamber music ensemble, these self-proclaimed “modern vikings” have reached dizzying heights in their first 10 years. The quartet combines a passion for Scandinavian composers – whom they frequently incorporate into adventurous contemporary programs – with highly skilled and profound performances of the classical masterpieces. Their recording, “Wood Works,” a journey through Nordic folk music, was named Best Classical Album of 2014 by NPR. The Danish String Quartet continues to solidify their sterling reputation as “one of the best quartets before the public today” (Washington Post) – all without pillaging cities or razing the English coastline!

 

 

Yolanda Kondonassis, harp & Jason Vieaux, guitar

Sunday, March 5, 2017

Hailed as “a brilliant and expressive player” (Dallas Morning News), Yolanda Kondonassis is celebrated as one of the world’s premier solo harpists Since making her debut at age 18 with the New York Philharmonic and Zubin Mehta, she has performed across the globe as a concerto soloist and in recital, bringing her unique brand of musicianship and warm artistry to an ever-increasing audience. A published author, speaker, professor of harp, and environmental activist, she brilliantly weaves her many passions into a vibrant, multi-faceted career. Joining her for for this Music in the Park Series concert is world-renowned guitarist, Jason Vieaux, who, in the words of NPR, is “perhaps the most precise and soulful classical guitarist of his generation.” The New York Times lauds his playing as “virtuosic, flamboyant, dashing and sometimes ineffably lyrical.” With his remarkably varied repertoire, Jason Vieaux is hailed by critics as the classical guitarist who goes beyond the classical. The Kondonassis-Vieaux album, appropriately titled “Together,” offers a glimpse into the vast musical possibilities of this instrumental collaboration.

 

 
 

Alina Ibragimova, violin & Cédric Tiberghien, piano

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Performing music from baroque to new commissions, on both modern and period instruments, Russian-born violinist Alina Ibragimova seemingly defies the laws of physics, playing with an “immediacy and honesty” that collapses “any sense of distance between performer and listener” (The Guardian). Ibragimova has a long-standing partnership with pianist Cédric Tiberghien, whose flourishing international career spans five continents where he has performed at some of the world’s most prestigious halls. In the words of BBC Music Magazine, “Few players of this music combine such clarity and articulation with shimmering sparkle and virtuosic flair; this is sophisticated pianism.”

 

 

Daedalus String Quartet with Wilhelmina Smith, cello & Linda Kelsey, narrator

Sunday, April 23, 2017

The Daedalus String Quartet is joined by Twin Cities cellist Wilhelmina Smith and actor Linda Kelsey for the final Music in the Park Series performance of the 2016-2107 season. Praised for its adventurous exploration of contemporary music, the New York-based Daedalus Quartet has established itself as a leader among the new generation of string ensembles. Wilhelmina Smith has received critical acclaim as a solo recitalist, chamber musician and orchestral soloist in the United States and abroad. Rounding out this special performance is Minnesota’s own Linda Kelsey, a multiple Emmy and Golden Globe-winning actor with an extensive and impressive array of stage and screen credits. Kelsey, Smith and the Daedalus will explore music and literary texts associated with Beethoven’s Kreutzer Sonata.

 


 

Subscriptions

Subscriptions are on sale starting Monday, February 15, 2016 at 8:30am and can be purchased online at schubert.org/subscribe or by calling 651.292.3268.
International Artist Series five-concert subscriptions are $110, $145, $180, or $240. Student subscriptions are $55 (with valid I.D. and .edu email address). 
Music in the Park Series six-concert subscriptions are $144. Student subscriptions are $66 (with valid I.D. and .edu email address). 
 

Single Tickets

Single tickets will be on sale August 1, 2016 at 11am. 
International Artist Series performances in the Concert Hall start at $25.
International Artist Series performances in the Music Theater start at $30.
Music in the Park Series performances start at $29.