To say that Gil Shaham is one of the foremost violinists of our time may actually be a bit of an understatement. Shaham’s career took off in 1989 when he replaced the legendary Itzhak Perlman (who was unable to perform for health reasons) for a six-concerto, three-night marathon with the London Symphony Orchestra at Royal Festival Hall. Still a high school senior and a student at Juilliard, Shaham stepped off the Concorde at Heathrow to find a throng of reporters, onlookers, and curiosity seekers. If the 18-year old seemed unfazed by it all, perhaps it’s because he’d made his debut with the Jerusalem Symphony at age 10 and with the Israel Philharmonic the following year. His flawless technique combined with his inimitable warmth and generosity of spirit has solidified his renown as a true American master. A multiple Grammy Award-winner and Musical America’s “Instrumentalist of the Year,” Shaham has played virtually every major concert hall in the world. The Schubert Club is thrilled to welcome Gil Shaham back to the Ordway Music Theater stage for a single performance this season and his second appearance in the International Artist Series.

Gil Shaham

Gil Shaham

Gil Shaham already has more than two dozen concerto and solo CDs to his name, including bestsellers that have ascended the record charts in the U.S. and abroad. These recordings have earned prestigious awards, including multiple Grammys, a Grand Prix du Disque, Diapason d’Or, and Gramophone Editor’s Choice. Gil Shaham was awarded an Avery Fisher Career Grant in 1990, and in 2008 he received the coveted Avery Fisher Prize. In 2012, he was named “Instrumentalist of the Year” by Musical America, which cited the “special kind of humanism” with which his performances are imbued.

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Shaham was born in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, in 1971. He moved with his parents to Israel, where he began violin studies with Samuel Bernstein of the Rubin Academy of Music at the age of seven, receiving annual scholarships from the America-Israel Cultural Foundation. In 1981, while studying with Haim Taub in Jerusalem, he made debuts with the Jerusalem Symphony and the Israel Philharmonic. That same year he began his studies with Dorothy DeLay and Jens Ellermann at Aspen. In 1982, after taking first prize in Israel’s Claremont Competition, he became a scholarship student at Juilliard, where he worked with DeLay and Hyo Kang. He also studied at Columbia University.

 He plays the 1699 “Countess Polignac” Stradivarius, and lives in New York City with his wife, violinist Adele Anthony, and their three children.

Date & Venue

Sunday, January 8, 2017, 3pm
Ordway Music Theater
Directions

Please join us one hour prior to the performance for a pre-concert talk with David Evan Thomas.

Tickets

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Single tickets go on sale August 1, 2016 at 11am. Single ticket prices start at just $30. You may purchase single tickets at 11am on August 1, 2016 online or by calling The Schubert Club Ticket Office at 651.292.3268.

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Program

Program to be announced.

Concerts are estimated to be approximately 2 hours with one intermission.

More info:

Gil Shaham on Facebook

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Gil Shaham’s Webpage

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Technical perfection on an Olympian scale met with fervent emotional commitment…

Cleveland Plain Dealer

Go-for-broke passion is a hallmark of his playing—as are his silvery tone, spot-on intonation and meticulously molded phrasing.”

Washington Post

The Illinois-born, Israel-bred violinist could give the inimitable Jascha (Heifetz) a close race in the razzle-dazzle department.

Chicago Tribune

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